Biomass Facts

We harvest a mix of lodgepole pine, spruce, and fir trees, approximately 50% of which is processed into manufactured lumber. The other 50% becomes byproduct residuals and waste streams that are collectively called “residuals” and have significant value in their energy potential. Residuals include in-forest fibre from the harvesting process tree tops, branches, low grade logs damaged by insects or disease, hog fuel (bark), shavings, sawdust, and trim blocks from the lumber manufacturing process.

Sawmill residuals and in-forest fibre in British Columbia are required to be either utilized or burnt as a waste management measure, to reduce fire hazard as required by the BC Wildfire Regulation (2005) and to avoid the risk of disease and pest infestation. Finding opportunities to use this former waste material contributes to British Columbia’s health, greenhouse gas reduction, and economic value objectives.

In British Columbia, forests are managed provincially. 95% of provincial lands are publicly owned and managed through a comprehensive regulatory framework for land and resource use planning, which includes direction for the establishment of protected areas and operational forest planning. Our forest regulations are rated among the most stringent in the world and our fibre sourcing and forest products are certified sustainable through the independent and globally recognized Sustainable Forest Initiative.

Biomass Facts

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We harvest a mix of lodgepole pine, spruce, and fir trees, approximately 50% of which is processed into manufactured lumber. The other 50% becomes byproduct residuals and waste streams that are collectively called “residuals” and have significant value in their energy potential. Residuals include in-forest fibre from the harvesting process tree tops, branches, low grade logs damaged by insects or disease, hog fuel (bark), shavings, sawdust, and trim blocks from the lumber manufacturing process.

Sawmill residuals and in-forest fibre in British Columbia are required to be either utilized or burnt as a waste management measure, to reduce fire hazard as required by the BC Wildfire Regulation (2005) and to avoid the risk of disease and pest infestation. Finding opportunities to use this former waste material contributes to British Columbia’s health, greenhouse gas reduction, and economic value objectives.

In British Columbia, forests are managed provincially. 95% of provincial lands are publicly owned and managed through a comprehensive regulatory framework for land and resource use planning, which includes direction for the establishment of protected areas and operational forest planning. Our forest regulations are rated among the most stringent in the world and our fibre sourcing and forest products are certified sustainable through the independent and globally recognized Sustainable Forest Initiative.